Newspaper Archive of
The Malakoff News
Malakoff, Texas
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October 20, 1977     The Malakoff News
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October 20, 1977
 

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Page 2-MALAKOFF NEWS-October 20, 1977 %', :::: .:.: Publisher .......................................... Donna S. Alexander iiii Editor., ................................................... Ann Rounsavall ::!::i Sports Editor.. ............................................ David Holmes !::ii Advertising Mgr ........................................... Bob Scheibe ::i:-i Office Manager ......................................... Lorl Callaway !i!i Production .............................. .Loll Shelton, Vicki Svoboda !i I Bookkeeper ................................................. Mary Dillard i:::::: .%. adjoining counties. $5.50 per year elsewhere in Texas. and $6.50 per year outside Texas. Entered in the Post Office at Malakoff. Texas 75148 as a second elass matter. Published ii "'l" :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::------ "*'" 1977 A$__fCIATIONPnS" ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 00I00LI)J Am-Wide Study Planned i-":: t .o ,,,, ii Cm m ittee Organi zed To Determine County Needs ;.y ad lib by donna kheibe abxmdm' In the U.S. Senate reCently some senators were appalled at a proposed amendment which would allow children 10 and II years old to work as farm hands. Sen. Jacob Javits of New York headed the opposition, quoting Secretary of Labor Ray Marshall who claimed that children working in the fields would be "dangerously exposed to toxic chemicals and power-driven mach- inery." Obviously Sen. Javits was not one of the children who worked as farm hands during' World War II when only women and children were available to harvest the crops. My brother, two years younger than me, and I were reminiscing last weekend a- bout our field hand days. "Can you believe we ever worked so hard?" we asked each other. "Were we really that young?" I was II and he was 9 the summer of 1942. We were living in a rural area near Seattle where there was a tremendous amount of truck farming and fruit orchards. We picked strawberries, beans, raspberries, pie cherries, peas, and -- nastiest job of all -- dug gladiola bulbs. So did a whole lot of other kids the same age -- and younger. Not only did we work an eight to ten hour day, we walked five and six miles to the fields. Gas rationing meant mother couldn't pro- vide transportation via mily car. In those days hadst familes only had one car, and Father drove it to work. If we wanted to work, we had to hoof it there and hack. Getting there wasn't too bad, butwelived at the top of a hill and after a day of crawling on our hands and knees to pick strawberries, or dig bulbs, that uphill trek home was tough going. We didn't get rich, even though wages were higher than usual because of the war. Berry picking netted us between $4 and $5 a day each, cash, and we were able to take it home with us. Bean picking was most lucrative; I think our best was a $7 day. That was a lot of money fo an 11 and a 9 year old. It was the first money I ever earned and no wages since have ever seemed quite so exciting. Not only were we exposed to pesticides, we ate pounds and pounds of unwashed berries that had been spray- ed. Our earnings on rasp- berries, especially, would have been much higher if we'd put more in the flats and less in our stomachs. We knew the fruit was sprayed but it didn't worry us. Apparently, we were tough kids because we didn't get sick, nor did any of our friends picking and eating beside us. Machinery didn't frighten us. We just detested the noisy tractor that relentlessly turn- ed over the earth in front of us while we crawled behind dig- ging gladiola bulbs out of the dirt with our bare hands. Nobody worried about poll- ution, pesticides, danger from machinery, or exploitation of child labor, There was no exploitation. Kids were paid the same as adults. You earned what you picked and if the crop was edible you ate all you wanted Looking back on +that sum- mer, I suspect.some of the farmers who hired us were the exploited ones. I'm sure we ate a good percentage of the edible crops, and there's no counting the number of pie cherry trees that didn't sur- vive those summers when kids did the harvesting. We climbed the trees and broke the branches and had pie cherry duels with the kids in the next tree. And a lot of us got fired. But there was always the next crop to harvest. Senator Javits and his poli- tical allies needn't worry about kids working in the fields. Generations of us have worked in the fields and children today who live on farms and ranches are still working as farm hands. Kids working in the fields have a safer, healthier en- vironment than their city cousins. Sen. Javits should spend some time worrying about the 10 and 11 year olds who are exposed to freeway traffic, smog, pollution, mugging, rape, and big city crime. Those are the children who are "dangerously exposed to toxic chemicals and power- driven machinery." A county wide committee was organized Wednesday to determine the needs of the county through local input. The committee, formed by 12 members from various areas of the county, will analyze needs and impact of various projects that could be funded through the Economic Development Administration since Henderson County qual- ifies as a redevelopment area. The basis for qualifying for EDA funds is the level of employment in the county. The purpose of the program is to create jobs in underdevel- oped areas. Henderson County's 7.5un- employment rate made the area eligible for the program. Dave Krieder of EDA's regional office in Austin at- tended the organizational meeting. He told members the first priority should be to determine what community facilities are now available, what the work force from each area is. and what proj- ects could be used to improve economic development. Ron Cox, East Texas Coun- cil of Governments (ETCOG) also attended the meeting and offered his assistance to sort through statistics and com- pile information to justify projects. Members of the committee for the next two weeks will collect statistics from specific areas which will include a general description, popu- lation and labor force, new industry, changes in econ- omy, community facilities, utilities, tourism, and busi- ness industry. The second meeting of the committee will be Thursday, Oct. 2% at 10 a.m. at the county courtroom. Members include Bennie Garza and Wayne Mackley of Athens, Bradley Hughes of Brownsboro, Ken Cade of Chandler, Ross Chambers of Eustace, Dave Leinback of Gun Barrel City, County Judge Winston Reagan, Mel- inda Wallace of LaRue, City Judge L.E. Orr of Malakoff, Mayor Paul Kemm, Mur- chison, Mrs. Bennie Pickle of Poynor, Mayor Joe Greenhaw of Seven Points, and Ann Rounsavall of Trinidad Police Report by Chief Richard Wilson Malakoff Police investigat- vehicle, disorderly ed the reported theft of four and carrying a tires and wheels and a tool weapon. box from a pick-up owned by Monday Miers, Ray Glover. The theft occur- an officer with the ed October 12 while the Police Department, vehicle was parked at the an Athens man on Glover home during the night, koff traffic Estimated loss was set at $400. Sgt Eddie Miers and Re- serve Officer Don Johnson arrested an Athens man after stopping a vehicle on Hwy. 90 North October 13. The man was charged with drunk in vehicle. An Athens man was arrest- ed by Assistant Chief Sonny Miers after the officer stop- ped the vehicle on 31 east on a traffic violation. The man was arrested for drunk in Wall 489-0287 105 N. Tm-ry AND ELEANOR PH.489-1335 Today-LoisHarris Mi n's Bea ty Shop . , Malakoff Lions Club in Friday-Leon Hanson, S.C. X0 U memory of Lewis Vieregge Chandler, James Hollings- " Sr., $10.00; Vanice B. James worth H. 175 Eusbce 42 ' a a in memory of Lewis Vieregge Saturday-Jerry Ochoa, Grant Sr., $10.00; Mr. and Mrs. J.P. Brown, Randy Robertson Kodene Mixon = Phillips m memory of, Alton Sunday-Kipp McSweeney The new sports coverage offered this year by the four Territory Times newspapers has been very rewarding to all of us on the staff as we watch circulation increase and news stand sales double. We have also enjoyed provid- ing sports coverage for the smaller schools in our area which usually receive little publicity for their efforts. It has been a new experi- ence for some of us. Me in particular. I had never run the side- lines of a football field before this year. and had no experi- ence dodging football players on an end sweep. Some things you learn fast. Sports Editor David Holm- es told me last week that I had a great shot of a gang tackle...up real close and everything. "The only thing Ann," he said, "you weren't focused just right." "Focus wasn't the problem, David," I explained. "The problem was the shaking movement of my hands as [ stood with camera in hand with eight big football players running right at me," I said. Another problem I have had to cope with is determining whether to jump over or duck under the fence while run- ning. Fortunately, some deci- sions must be made quickly and on the spot. I made one big error in judgement. Last week, a little up tight and feeling the need to commune with nature, I suggested that Amy and Chad join me in walking to the football field for the game. Bobby was already there in his pickup, so our way home was secure. I chose to wear moccasins. It is further to the football field from our house than one would think just driving along. Price, $7.00; Mildred Roberts and Elma Francis Miller, $20.00; Mr. and Mrs. R.L. Simpson in memory of Brad Stacy, $20.00; Mrs. Brad Sta- cy in memory of Brad Stacy and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Cart- lidge, $10.00; Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Morgan in memory of Dewey Dodson, $10.00; and Mrs. Thad Stacy in memory of Lewis Vieregge Sr. and Dewey Dodson, $I0.00. Monday-Paul McMullen, Lisa Stone, Lisa Weaks Tuesday-Rodney Gilliam, Bil- ly Kay Davis Wednesday-Carl (Red) Tan- ner, Todd Monroe DWIG'H  JONES 0.D, OPTOMETRIST t 220S.PalestineBnx 889 , Closed Wed. Afternoons "675 2697 Athens, Tx. Hazel Lane & Lois Taylor- Ann Reese. Dress Shop Ladies Shoes, Dresses, Sportswear, Tops, Handbags, Children's Shoes, Jewelpj,. Cosmetics, Cologne & Gift Items. She didn't warn me about the moccasins, or remind me that I had to run the side- lines during the game. Those things became obvious to me as the evening progressed. A football game looks a lot different on ground level at the edge of a field than it does from the stands. I may never again be content as a normal spectator. Vo,-= 6,p (star,) (s-77) " P U B L I S H E R' S C O P Y State Bank No...... 21 30 Consolidated Report of Condition of" ............ C.t,..i...z.e.n..s....S..t..a.te...B .an..k. .......... of ....... H.a...a..k.9...... ................... in the State of ..... .T..ex.a..s.. ................................................. and Domestic Subsidiaries at the close business on ...... S.ep.t.e.mber...30,. .......... ,19..7.7... 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34, 35. 36. 37. 38, 1. Thou. I BALANCE SHEET ASSETS Sch__ Item Cot._ M,I. 982 J Cash and due from banks " C 7 ................................... U.S. Treasury securities ............................................................................. B 1 E ................................... 1 O0 ] 5oo I Obligations of other U.S. Government agencies and corporations .............. B 2 E ................................... [ Obligations of States and political subdivisions .......................................... B 3 E ................................... 2 1  ] ! Other bonds, notes, and debentures .......................................................... B 4 E ................................... 13one I t Corporate stock ............................................................................................................................................................... none ] Trading account securities ....................................................... . ...................................................................................... none] Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell .. D 4 none I a. Loans, Total (excluding inearned income) A 10 O k, :.:7 :!i %;,'i:: b. Less: Reserve for possible loan losses ..................................................................................... -...-, , . _ C. Loans, Net ........ ?.'. ............................................................................................ " ........................ " ..........  ......................... "15 [ Direct lease financing . ' " " " ['OTI' r Bank premises, furniture and fixtures, and other assets representing bank premises Real estate owned other than bank premises .................................................................................................................. ).1, I Investments in unconsolidated subsidiaries and associated companies ........................................................................ none l Customers' liability to this bank on acceptances outstanding ......................................................................................... none j Other assets ................................................................................................ G 7 ................................................. 13 I TOTAL ASSETS (sum of items 1 thru 15) ...................................................................................................................... "I0 1 [ LIABILITIES Sch. Item Cot. Demand deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations ............... F If A .................................. -3 LL Time and savings deposits of individuals, partnerships, and corporations . F If B+C ............................ A 6B Deposits of United States Government ...................................................... F 2 A+B+C ........................ 1 Deposits of States and political subdivisions ............................................ F 3 A+B+C ........................ 1 021 Deposits of foreign governments and official institutions .......................... F 4 A+B-I-C ........................ none Deposits of commercial banks ................................................................ F 5+6 A+B+C ........................ none Certified and officers' checks ...................................................................... F 7 A ..................................  TOTAL DEPOSITS (sum of items'17 thru 23) ...................  231 , a. Total demand deposits F 8 A ::'-, !!!!' b. Total time and savings deposits ............................................................ F 8 B+C 0. ....   Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase E 4 " none Other liabilities for borrowed money ............................................................................................................................... 13one Mortgage indebtedness .................................................................................................................................................... none Acceptances executed by or for account of this bank and outstanding ......................................................................... none Other liabilities ..................................................................................... H 9 ................................................. 2 TOTAL LIABILITIES (excluding subordinated notes and debentures) ...........................................................................  2 Subordinated notes and debentures ................................................................................................................................ none.! EQUITY CAPITAL [ none (Par value) ..... none ] Preferred stock .......................................................... a. No. shares outstanding [ 10?OO Common stock ...................................................... a. No, shares authorized ] 1000 210 I b. No. shares outstanding .. (Par value) ...... 1 Surplus ............................................................................................................................................................................. _, Undivided profits ............................................................................................................................................................... "/' '1 Reserve for contingencies and other capital reserves ..................................................................................................... b ] TOTAL EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 32 thru 36) ..................................................................................................... 10 lS1 TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY CAPITAL (sum of items 30, 31 and 37) ..................................................................... MEMORANDA Average for 30 calendar days ending with call date: a. Cash and due from banks (corresponds to item 1 above) .......................................................................... b. Federal funds sold and securities purchased under agreements to resell (corresponds to item 8 above) ......... c. Total loans (corresponds to item 9a above) ........................................................................................................... d. Time deposits of $100,000 or more (corresponds to Memoranda items 3a plus 3b below) ................................... I 0 e. Total deposits (corresponds to item 24 above) ........................................................................................................ f. Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase (corresponds to item 25 above) none g. Other liabilities for borrowed money (corresponds to item 26 above) .................................................................. none Standby letters of credit outstanding (as of call date) ................................................................................... Time deposRs of $100,000 or more (as of call date): a. Time certificates of deposit in denominations of $1OO,OOO or more .......................................................... b, Other time deposits in amounts of $100.000 or more .......................................................................................... 2. 3. I, Jo..ce Faulk. Cashier , of t =boe..sd b=,d, do aosm { awsAR } t.st  ,.s.. of ...................................................................................................... AFFIRM "is tru a,d orrect. to ths best of roll icaoledge ad bslf. C m'reef,---A tst : o.o.o..oo,.o... .................... o ......  ................................................................... ........ .o .................................................................................................... o.ooo..o..o ........... . ........... o ............. .............................................................. | stau ! ............................. .T.e...x.a..s.. .................................... co=. o/ ............... :...t.t!..d...r.p...o. .................. s,-,. ............. 00.S..tb ........... o! ............ =.d I k,,b eert'if t I = m  officer m" dlreeto T of tkw _ ,, I ] / 1 L , M .,., ,,M,',, .............. .v,a. ..................... 19.Z ....... ..4N..g.,v (I And how those ball players continue to run from one end of the field to another, push- ing each other no less, is a mystery to me. Youth, I suppose, and conditioning. About three-quarters of the way there I realized what a long way it is from our house to the field. Amy tried to tell me how foolish the walk was to begin with She pointed out that 1 had told her never to walk on the street in the dark, that we would probably be late for the game (we did miss the natio- nal anthem) and that every- one would think we were crazy. CHECK ;:::i:i:;:i:i:!:i:i:i:i:i:i:i:i::.:!:i::::::::.::::i:!:;:;::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: fl p n government suing another. When the Commissioners' Court appoints members to the hospital board, certain duties are delegated to them. You feel these individual are competent, dependable and honorable people; capable of making the right decisions. I feel our present and past hospital board members have been this type of individual. "Evidently, our present board has been led down a one-way steet in filing this lawsuit against the taxpayers of this county that have paid out enormous salaries for a great number of years for ad- ministration of our county hospital. Not only have they abused their delegated authority in filing this law- suit. bad judgment was used in allowing such an order to exist. This order is discrimin- atory and unfair to the other employees of the hospital and county. "I feel that this board should be representing the people of Henderson County. The people whose tax dollars built and are now paying for these facilities: a place that has been furnishing the ad- ministration (who has reaped a bountiful harvest from the taxpayers and citizens of Henderson County) a job. I do not feel the majority of the board members were aware at the time that this order was passed that they were allow- ing a delayed, accumulated rip-off. "Henderson County cannot continue to be a Santa Claus for all people at all times," he said. vious check, accounting for the difference in the original and amended bill. Simmons confirmed that the last check paid to Mrs. Vaughn on September 15 was for $264,72, but said the previous check issued from his office was for the standard monthly payroll amount of $882.40. County Judge Winston Rea- Fan issued a statement to the press Tuesday concerning the suit. "I feel," ReFan said, "that the hospital board, appointed by the Commissioners' Court, was in error in filing and joining with Mrs. Vaughn in filing a Writ of Mandamus lawsuit against the County. Since the hospital is a crea- ture of Henderson County, you have one entity of county (MAK]g MAKK FOR NOTARY'8 .AL) #I